Is Curry British or Indian?

Although curry is an Indian dish modified for British tastes, it’s so popular that it contributes more than £5bn to the British economy. Hence it was hardly surprising when in 2001, Britain’s foreign secretary Robin Cook referred to Chicken Tikka Masala as a “true British national dish”.

Is curry originally British?

Curry (as in a spiced dish) is the British name for various spicy dishes they encountered in India. Curry powder is a British invention, when the British tried to replicate Indian food back home.

Why is curry not Indian?

Because there is no dish in the typical Indian, Pakistani, Bengali or Sri Lankan home that is called a “curry.” India, for example, consists of twenty-eight states and most of these have their own regional cuisine. And people who migrated from India to the UK brought their local dishes with them.

Does curry come from India?

curry, (from Tamil kari: “sauce”), in Western usage, a dish composed with a sauce or gravy seasoned with a mixture of ground spices that is thought to have originated in India and has since spread to many regions of the world. The foundation of many Indian curries is a mixture of onion, ginger, and garlic.

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What country started curry?

Curry originated in the Indian subcontinent and the word comes from the Indian Tamil word “Kari”meaning a sauce or soup to be eaten with rice. It consists of a mix of spices of which coriander, turmeric, cumin, and red chilies are almost always a constant.

What do British mean by curry?

In Britain ‘curries’ have come to mean almost any dish from India though it is not a word used in the sub-continent. Neither is curry a spice, but a spicy recipe using spices and herbs with meat, fish and vegetable dishes from various Asian countries including Sri Lanka, Burma, Thailand, Malaysia, and Indonesia.

What is curry called in India?

There is no such thing as a “curry” in India

The word curry is simply used to describe the gravy or sauce in a dish in India. Curries have their own names, with different words denoting the presence of sauce including masala, salaan and jhol.

Why is curry Britain’s national dish?

Although curry is an Indian dish modified for British tastes, it’s so popular that it contributes more than £5bn to the British economy. Hence it was hardly surprising when in 2001, Britain’s foreign secretary Robin Cook referred to Chicken Tikka Masala as a “true British national dish”.

Are all curries Indian?

No Indian language uses the term, and the closest-sounding words usually just mean “sauce.” Curry is, supposedly, Indian. But there is no such word in any of the country’s many official languages.

Why do the British like curry so much?

Why? It’s a mystery. Queen Victoria loved Indian food and the upper and middle classes loved to copy her, and soon curry was an integral part of the British diet. An 1852 cookbook stated that “few dinners are thought complete unless [curry] is on the table.”

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Do Brits like Indian food?

Britons still love Indian food but tastes have evolved from heavy curry house dishes to lighter, more authentic styles. London, United Kingdom – Indian food has long been a staple in the United Kingdom: The rich onion-based gravy of vindaloo, bhuna, tikka masala or madras are a familiar, comforting taste.

What is England’s national dish?

The dish has taken on a large cultural significance in Britain. It is widely considered the country’s national dish, and in 2001 British Foreign Secretary Robin Cook gave a speech in which he hailed chicken tikka masala as a symbol of modern multicultural Britain.

Is curry Indian or Japanese?

Definitely, the two cuisines share some similarities, but Indian curry has been around for far longer. The word “curry” itself is derived from the word “kari” of the Tamil people of India and Sri Lanka, which means “sauce” or generally denotes vegetables and meat cooked with spices.

Which curry was invented in the UK?

Historians of ethnic food, Peter and Colleen Grove, discuss multiple origin-claims of chicken tikka masala, concluding that the dish “was most certainly invented in Britain, probably by a Bangladeshi chef”.