Quick Answer: How much does it cost to trade through the Indian Ocean?

How did they trade in the Indian Ocean?

Long before Europeans “discovered” the Indian Ocean, traders from Arabia, Gujarat, and other coastal areas used triangle-sailed dhows to harness the seasonal monsoon winds. Domestication of the camel helped bring coastal trade goods such as silk, porcelain, spices, incense, and ivory to inland empires, as well.

Was the Indian Ocean used for trade?

The Indian Ocean Trade began with small trading settlements around 800 A.D., and declined in the 1500’s when Portugal invaded and tried to run the trade for its own profit. As trade intensified between Africa and Asia, prosperous city-states flourished along the eastern coast of Africa.

What is a valuable item to trade on the Indian Ocean?

These included Kilwa, Sofala, Mombasa, Malindi, and others. The city-states traded with inland kingdoms like Great Zimbabwe to obtain gold, ivory, and iron. These materials were then sold to places like India, Southeast Asia, and China. These were Africa’s exports in the Indian Ocean Trade.

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What currency was used in the Indian Ocean Trade?

Rupees: The Rupee had been introduced to East Africa at various stages: the Imperial British East Africa Company introduced it to the East Africa Protectorate (today, Kenya) in the late 1880s, and the Germans introduced it to Tanganyika in 1890.

What was the primary way of trading in the Indian Ocean?

How did monsoons make Indian Ocean trade possible? Monsoons alternated wind currents that predictably blew eastward during the summer months and westward in the winter. When people understood what monsoons did, they accumulated different ways to build ships and developed oceanic navigation.

What technology spreads through the Indian Ocean trade?

Indian Ocean Trade Network

Chinese invented larger ships and the magnetic compass, likewise added momentum of commercial growth. Larger ships meant more cargo and spices across the ocean and all over the world, and the magnetic compass to know which direction they are going.

Who started Indian Ocean trade?

The Portuguese under Vasco da Gama discovered a naval route to the Indian Ocean through the southern tip of Africa in 1497–98. Initially, the Portuguese were mainly active in Calicut, but the northern region of Gujarat was even more important for trade, and an essential intermediary in east–west trade.

What are some of the reasons the Indian Ocean trade took off and was so popular?

What are some of the reasons the Indian Ocean Trade took off and was so popular? They were seasonal and consistent. Monsoons would help carry ships from Africa to India between April and September. They carried ships back from November to February.

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How did the Indian Ocean trade affect the environment?

European colonial exploitation of Indian Ocean resources resulted in the first clear evidence of the degradation of both the terrestrial and oceanic environments. Deforestation, cultivation, and guano mining have had undesirable effects on terrestrial ecosystems.

Who dominated how Indian Ocean trade worked?

But despite this diversity, for the most part, especially on the Western half of the Indian Ocean basin, the trade was dominated by Muslim merchants. Why? Largely because they had the money to build ships, although we will see that in the 15th century, the Chinese state could have changed that balance completely.

Why is the Indian Ocean trade important?

The Indian Ocean is home to major sea routes connecting the Middle East, Africa and East Asia with Europe and the Americas. These vital sea routes (i) facilitate maritime trade in the Indian Ocean region, (ii) carry more than half of the world’s sea-borne oil,3 and (iii) host 23 of the world’s top 100 container ports.

How long did the Indian Ocean trade last?

For roughly 700 years, the Indian Ocean was the center of the greatest international trade network the world had ever seen. First truly rising around 800 CE and maintaining its dominance until the 1500s CE, these networks connected the Afro-Eurasian supercontinent in one massive cycle of trade.