Who was the last of India?

Lord Louis Mountbatten, cousin of King George VI and a hero of World War II, is named the last British colonial administrator of India. As Britain had promised independence to India at the end of World War II, his appointment enraged many Indians.

Who was a last Viceroy of India?

That man was Lord Louis Mountbatten, the last Viceroy of British India.

Who was the last Viceroy of India answers?

Complete solution:

Lord Mountbatten was the last Viceroy of the British Indian Empire and the first Governor-General of independent India.

Why was the last Viceroy of India?

After independence in 1947, the title viceroy was abandoned and although governors continued to act as representatives of King George VI, India and Pakistan were headed by their own native governor-generals. … Chakravarti Rajagopalachari (1878-1972) became the only Indian and last governor-general after independence.

Who was first governor?

In accordance with the provisions of the Regulating Act of 1773, Warren Hastings became the first governor-general.

Who is India’s first Governor-General?

The Saint Helena Act 1833 (or Government of India Act 1833) re-designated the office with the title of Governor-General of India. Lord William Bentinck was first to be designated as the Governor general of India in 1833.

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Who is the first and last viceroy of India?

Governor-General of India

Viceroy and Governor-General of India
Formation 20 October 1773
First holder Warren Hastings
Final holder Lord Mountbatten (February 1947 – August 1947 as Viceroy of India) Chakravarthi Rajagopalachari (1948–1950 as Governor-general of Dominion of India)
Abolished 26 January 1950

Who made the first map of India?

James Rennell, (born Dec. 3, 1742, Chudleigh, Devon, Eng. —died March 29, 1830, London), the leading British geographer of his time. Rennell constructed the first nearly accurate map of India and published A Bengal Atlas (1779), a work important for British strategic and administrative interests.

Who wrote the book The History of British India?

Book description

James Mill’s three volume History of British India was published from 1817 to 1818 and became an immediate success.

Who gave up India?

Louis Mountbatten, 1st Earl Mountbatten of Burma

Admiral of the Fleet The Right Honourable The Earl Mountbatten of Burma KG GCB OM GCSI GCIE GCVO DSO ADC PC FRS
Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru
Preceded by Himself (As Viceroy and Governor-General)
Succeeded by C. Rajagopalachari
Viceroy and Governor-General of India

Why did Britain pull out of India?

One reason why the British were reluctant to leave India was that they feared India would erupt into civil war between Muslims and Hindus. … In 1947 the British withdrew from the area and it was partitioned into two independent countries – India (mostly Hindu) and Pakistan (mostly Muslim).

Why did Mountbatten Partition India?

Plan for partition: 1946–1947

Mountbatten hoped to revive the Cabinet Mission scheme for a federal arrangement for India. But despite his initial keenness for preserving the centre, the tense communal situation caused him to conclude that partition had become necessary for a quicker transfer of power.

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Is India under Queen Elizabeth?

Queen Victoria became Empress of India in May 1876. … India had been under crown rule since 1858, and before this under the dominion of the East India Company, who took control in 1757.

Is Mughal family still alive?

An apparent descendant of the wealthy Mughal dynasty, who now lives on a pension. Ziauddin Tucy is the sixth generation descendant of the last Mughal Emperor Bahadur Shah Zafar and today struggles to make ends meet. … Tucy has two unemployed sons and is currently living on pension .

Who killed Aurangzeb?

History. Mughal emperor Aurangzeb died in 1707 after a 49-year reign without officially declaring a crown prince. His three sons Bahadur Shah I, Muhammad Azam Shah, and Muhammad Kam Bakhsh fought each other for the throne. Azam Shah declared himself successor to the throne, but was defeated in battle by Bahadur Shah.