Why did global trade lead Portugal to establish coastal outposts around the Indian Ocean?

What factors facilitated the Portuguese entry into Indian Ocean trade?

-Desired direct access to spices and luxuries of the Indian Ocean (salt, gold, slaves), Portuguese participation in north African trade in gold, salt, slaves, and other products, sugar was being grown exploiting natives to disease so they needed more slaves, Reconquista.

Who were the first Europeans to break into the Indian Ocean trade?

Portuguese explorer Vasco de Gama becomes the first European to reach India via the Atlantic Ocean when he arrives at Calicut on the Malabar Coast. Da Gama sailed from Lisbon, Portugal, in July 1497, rounded the Cape of Good Hope, and anchored at Malindi on the east coast of Africa.

Where did the Portuguese set up a port for their spice trade?

Taking advantage of the rivalries that pitted Hindus against Muslims, the Portuguese established several forts and trading posts between 1500 and 1510. Portugal established trading ports at far-flung locations like Goa, Ormuz, Malacca, Kochi, the Maluku Islands, Macau, and Nagasaki.

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Which countries followed the Portuguese in establishing trade post empires?

Most prominent of those who followed the Portuguese into the Indian ocean were english and dutch mariners. English and Dutch merchants built trading posts on Asian coasts and wanted to channel trade through them.

What did the Portuguese trade in the Indian Ocean?

In 1499, da Gama returned to Portugal and told the king and queen, who had sponsored his voyage, everything that he’d seen, including the shiploads of gold, ivory, porcelain, silk, and cotton being bought and sold in the port cities along the eastern coast of Africa.

How did Portugal impact the Indian Ocean trade in the 16th and 17th centuries quizlet?

By mid 16th century Portuguese merchants had over 50 trading posts between W Africa and E Asia. … Trading Post Empires established controlled trade throughout the Indian Ocean by the Portuguese in the 16th and 17th century, and spread the knowledge of Asian waters to other nations.

Why did the Portuguese start exploring?

Motivated by the desire for new markets and an ongoing opposition to the Muslims, Portuguese sailors had begun to explore the West African coast in the first half of the fifteenth century.

How did the Portuguese establish footholds and trade on Africa’s coasts?

How did the Portuguese establish footholds and trade on Africa’s coasts? They established forts and trading posts on the coast and seized key ports around the Indian Ocean. In 1492, Christopher Columbus set sail westward across the Atlantic Ocean to solve a problem of geography.

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How did Portuguese exploration lead to the creation of a trading empire?

How did Portuguese exploration lead to the creation of a trading empire? They seized key ports around the Indian Ocean, home to many goods and spices that were unique. … He wanted to make it to Asia to find a faster trade route by sailing west, was sponsored by Spain, and actually landed in the Caribbean.

Why did Portugal take the lead in exploration?

Portugal was leading the way in the early days of oceanic exploration due to their development of sailing innovations, along with the strong support provided by their government, including the overseas enthusiast Prince Henry. New markets were opening due to the increasingly wealthier Portuguese.

How did the Portuguese use geographic factors to help them control the spice trade?

How did the Portuguese use geographic factors to help them control the spice trade? They conquered inland kingdoms, which they turned into a trading empire. They used force and diplomacy to set up coastal trading posts. They used diplomacy to establish alliances with inland Indian rulers and Arab traders.

How did the Portuguese control the spice trade?

How did the Portuguese control the spice trade? They did it by using their sea power to set up colonies, setting up the Dutch East India Company, and establishing permanent ties with locals. … They were not interested in any European trade items.