Your question: Which Portuguese explorer discovered a route to India?

Christopher Columbus’ unsuccessful search for a western maritime route to India resulted in the “discovery” of the Americas in 1492, but it was Vasco da Gama who ultimately established the Carreira da India, or India Route, when he sailed around Africa and into the Indian Ocean, landing at Calicut (modern Kozhikode), …

What Portuguese explorer found the route to India?

Vasco da Gama, Portuguese Vasco da Gama, 1er conde da Vidigueira, (born c. 1460, Sines, Portugal—died December 24, 1524, Cochin, India), Portuguese navigator whose voyages to India (1497–99, 1502–03, 1524) opened up the sea route from western Europe to the East by way of the Cape of Good Hope.

Who discovered route to Portugal India?

Portuguese explorer Vasco de Gama becomes the first European to reach India via the Atlantic Ocean when he arrives at Calicut on the Malabar Coast. Da Gama sailed from Lisbon, Portugal, in July 1497, rounded the Cape of Good Hope, and anchored at Malindi on the east coast of Africa.

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Which Portuguese explorer discovered an all water route from Europe to India?

The Portuguese nobleman Vasco da Gama (1460-1524) sailed from Lisbon in 1497 on a mission to reach India and open a sea route from Europe to the East.

Which Portuguese explorer discovered a route to Africa?

In 1488, Portuguese explorer Bartolomeu Dias (c. 1450-1500) became the first European mariner to round the southern tip of Africa, opening the way for a sea route from Europe to Asia.

Who Killed Vasco da Gama?

Vasco da Gama immediately invoked his high viceregent powers to impose a new order in Portuguese India, replacing all the old officials with his own appointments. But Gama contracted malaria not long after arriving, and died in the city of Cochin on Christmas Eve in 1524, three months after his arrival.

What did Vasco da Gama discover in India?

After two years he set sail from Lisbon, da Gama arrived on the Western sea coast of India at Kozhikode (Calicut), Kerala. He became the first European explorer that reached India via sea. He is often credited for discovering the sea route from western Europe to the East by way of the Cape of Good Hope.

Who found sea route to India first?

1, where Vasco da Gama is credited with “the discovery of the new route to an old-world.” 2 Historical writings by Indian historians have without exception repeated the same view. They all credit Vasco da Gama for discovering the sea-route to India.

Who discovered sea route of India from Europe?

Vasco da Gama’s name has figured in all history books, whether they relate to World, European,1 Asian or Indian history,2 as a great sailor and adventurer. He has been solely credited with the honour of having discovered the sea-route from Europe to India via the Cape of Good Hope.

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Who discovered the sea route India and when?

1498 – …

The Portuguese discovery of the sea route to India was the first recorded trip directly from Europe to India, via the Cape of Good Hope. Under the command of Portuguese explorer Vasco da Gama, it was undertaken during the reign of King Manuel I in 1495–1499.

Why did Vasco da Gama sail India?

Vasco da Gama was a Portuguese explorer who sailed to India from Europe. Gold, spices, and other riches were valuable in Europe. … Europeans during this time were looking to find a faster way to reach India by sailing around Africa. Da Gama accomplished the task.

Who helped Vasco da Gama find India?

Vasco da Gama reportedly took Kanji Malam onboard at Malindi in East Africa, and since Kanji Malam had excellent knowledge of the sea route to India, he could guide Vasco da Gama to Calicut, also known as ‘Kozhikode’ in the present day.

Who sponsored Vasco da Gama?

Vasco da Gama’s first voyage was paid for and outfitted by the royal Portuguese treasury under King Manuel I. The Portuguese royal family’s practice of funding voyages of exploration had been well-established earlier in the 15th century by Prince Henry the Navigator.